Oh Hey, Its You

22 | Student | Writer | Artist | Aspiring Buddhist

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medschool-thenbabies:

Telling your son not to “be such a girl” lets his sister who overhears the conversation know that being a girl is not a good thing and she should be sorry and ashamed of herself.

It also reminds your son that being a boy is better than being a girl and therefore he is better than any girl he will ever meet.

(via internal-acceptance-movement)

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Permalink wildinwoods:

Meditate!
Via http://www.pinterest.com/rj6686/
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Permalink coordinatebraintomouth:

Today I let one of the girls at my internship paint my nails. A few girls exclaimed, “that’s weird!” and one boy timidly asked, “are you actually letting her paint your nails?” I told them that boys are allowed to paint their nails and asked them who told them they couldn’t? None of them had an answer. And one-by-one the boys came over to the nail painting station and started doing their own nails, and each others nails, and one boy even got really excited and asked if he could do my other hand and it was just a really cool thing to see.  When the parents came to pick up the kids, the boy who had enthusiastically painted my nails, started scraping off his nail polish. I asked him why he was doing that an he said that one time he wore his sister’s nail polish and his dad gave him a “whoopin’”. And then, in the meekest voice I’ve very heard, he whispers, “but next time I come to [the program], I think I’ll just paint them again, anyways… I think sometimes parents can be wrong about stuff too.” I half-smiled and whispered back, “I think you might be right.” And helped him take the rest off with nail polish remover.
And that was the coolest moment of my day.
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6 Ways to Talk to Your Son About Male Violence and Healthy Masculinity

fuckyeahfeminists:

fuckmonosexismforever:

6 Ways to Talk to Your Son About Male Violence and Healthy Masculinity

Boys as young as 4 year old are told to “be a man!”, usually in response to them crying or showing fear.

And as they grow up, they’re bombarded with messages that say to be a “manly” man, they need to:

  • Be big and strong
  • Be physically aggressive and ready to fight
  • Show no emotions – especially fear or pain but anger is just fine
  • Feel entitled to objectify women and sexually pursue women regardless of whether or not she’s interested

It doesn’t take a leap of faith to see how this history has led to our society and media promoting images of masculinity as inherently obsessed with fighting and sex.

And then having some men turn that image into a reality where they feel entitled to be assault and dominate others, particularly women.

So many men are caring, responsible, and non-violent people. But while many men don’t use violence to express their feelings or control others, many don’t feel comfortable showing the other sides of them for fear of being called “gay”, “girly”, “soft,” or “emotional”.

That’s why we need to change the conversation around masculinity. We need the definition of masculinity to reflect the diversity present in men beyond the narrow box they have now.

Read More

(Source: queeringmisogyny)

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